Tag Archives: fresh

Blueberry Peach Crisp

My toddler, newborn, and I went blueberry picking yesterday at a local patch.  Here’s where I would insert a quaint picture of this “family first” if such a picture existed. Sadly, it does not! I had the newborn in the Moby in front of me, the toddler rolling in the mud, and me, the only one intent on squatting precariously in the muck to pick ripe berries.  The temperature was already almost 90 at 9 AM, and I had to move fast.  Eventually the toddler got interested in picking, but he was more interested in picking the berries from the mud.  I had to take them from his hands before they landed in the bucket.

I had been aiming for a blueberry pie, but with only twenty minutes of newborn’s patience, I got about a cup and a half out of the four I would need… Thank goodness it’s also peach season!

Peach and Blueberry Crumble

(very slightly edited from Ina Garten)

Ingredients

For the fruit:
2 pounds firm, ripe peaches (6 to 8 peaches)
2 teaspoons grated lemon zest
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

½ teaspoon of vanilla extract
1/2 cup granulated sugar (less if your peaches are very sweet)
1/4 cup cornstarch
1 ½ cups fresh blueberries
For the crumble:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup light brown sugar, lightly packed
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 pound (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, diced

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Immerse the peaches in boiling water for 30 seconds to 1 minute, until their skins peel off easily. Place them immediately in cold water. Peel the peaches, slice them into thick wedges, and place them in a large bowl. Add the lemon zest, lemon juice, vanilla extract, granulated sugar, and cornstarch. Toss well. Gently mix in the blueberries. Allow the mixture to sit for 5 minutes. Spoon the a 7×11 glass pan or small ramekins.

For the topping, combine the flour, granulated sugar, brown sugar, salt, cinnamon, and the butter in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Mix on low speed until the butter is the size of peas. Rub the mixture with your fingertips until it’s in big crumbles, then sprinkle evenly over the fruit. Place the ramekins on a sheet pan lined with parchment paper and bake for 40 to 45 minutes for ramekins, about 45-50 for a glass pan, or until the tops are browned and crisp and the juices are bubbly. Serve warm or at room temperature.

If you want to make these early, store the unbaked crisp in the refrigerator and bake before dinner.

lemons
I love fruit photography

I went searching for a delectable peach-blueberry crisp and broke the sacred rule of hot Julys— I turned on my oven! (gasp!). I hope I can tempt you to do the same.

berries and peaches
Another close up of the stars
batter
The topping ingredients
Blueberry Peach Cobbler
The finished, buttery product
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Freezing Tomatoes

If you’re like me, you hate grocery store tomatoes.  Anemic.  Pale pink.  Pathetic.  They just don’t taste as good. I don’t even like to used canned tomatoes, if I can avoid them because of the metallic taste that you can’t get rid of.  Boxed tomatoes are tasty, but expensive.  I’m still slightly intimidated by canning, but I like to preserve my food.  So, if you’re cheap, have an extra hour, and have access to a farmer’s market or a tomato plant of your own, freezing tomatoes can be a great option to enjoy that tomato flavor through the winter. 

This was my project today, and the little guy even helped (or at least watched with fascination.)

 

Materials needed:

Ripe tomatoes (larger varieties work best; don’t try to do this with cherries or you will drive yourself crazy!)

Large Pot

Paring knife

Several Large Bowls

Mesh Strainer

Quart freezer bags

Kitchen scale (optional)

Tomatoes, ripe and ready
Tomatoes, ripe and ready
  1. First, collect ripe tomatoes (though not over ripe or they may be difficult to work with) and wash them gently.  Don’t worry if their skins aren’t perfect since soon you’re going to get these tomatoes naked.  Scandalous!
  2. Prepare your work area, since you’ll need a lot of bowls for this project.  Place a large pot of water to boil and prepare a bowl of ice water near by.  Lay out another clean bowl next to that and finally, place your strainer over a final bowl.
  3. Make a tiny “x” on the bottom of each tomato, just deep enough to pierce the skin but not so deep as to cut into the seeds.  Working in batches, blanch the tomatoes for two minutes.  Place the blanched tomatoes in a bin of ice water. Once iced, the skins should slide easily from the tomatoes.
  4. With your paring knife (or a strawberry huller), remove the stem area from the tomato and seed.  Don’t be afraid to squish and squeeze the tomatoes a bit to get the seeds out.  Place the seeded and stemmed tomatoes in the mesh strainer to drain into a bowl.
  5. If desired, measure out preset quantities of your tomatoes for easy kitchen work.  I always do 1 lb bags for simplicity’s sake.  Press out all of the air and freeze flat for easy stacking.  The tomatoes should last at least three months, and for most freezers, could last much more than that without any loss of flavor. 
  6. Remember that bowl you were straining into?  Fresh tomato juice! Feel free to pass it though the strainer one more time for good measure.
  7. Ready for Bloody Marys!
    Ready for Bloody Marys!

Stuffed Peppers

It’s pepper season, and around here there is much rejoicing.  Last year my peppers received too much moisture and had a blight, but this year I’m so pepper-hungry that I can’t even wait to let them ripen to a sweet red before picking them.  That can only mean one thing:  Stuffed peppers.

Baby Green Peppers Continue reading Stuffed Peppers

Garden Wonderland/Disaster

Some days beg to be enjoyed outside, like the strangely cool late July day we’ve been having here in the Midwest.  Days like this one seem choreographed to bring a smile to my face.  The woodpecker landed at the suet feeder just as I step outside.  Six butternut squash were waiting to be picked in the garden, and my sunflowers are getting close to flowering.

Daylilies

I know flowers are part of the life cycle of the plants, just external reproductive systems, but it seems like such a gift to be able to enjoy their ephemeral beauty.  Even things like green beans and eggplant get the cutest little flowers on them. Continue reading Garden Wonderland/Disaster